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Mar 20

Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane

This is a tool that could well interest a few people. After a few years of on-off tool hunting, I’ve only come across a few Preston 2500P router planes and those I have found have tended to stay in my box and not sold on. They are a great tool to have around, but as I say, not easy to find.
A relatively new toolmaking duo from the US, Walke Moore, are now producing a similar plane that looks to be very nicely put together and looks to do the same job.
The 2500 (they dropped the ‘P’ because it’s not an exact copy of the Preston and it’s good to have some differentiation in the naming), is on their website now, priced at $274.00, with the option to add more knobs to the order.
Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane_5
You can choose the Preston or Stanley-style knobs, (although Stanley only made the the ’71’ configuration I believe) and the tool comes as a bronze, machined casting with an O1 steel cutter. The great thing about this style of plane is the enormous variety of uses, due to the different positions you can place the knobs.
It looks to be a well-made tool, although personally I would gripe at cleaning up pale wood because of bronze markings. That’s something that’s always made me shy away from LN bronze tools for the same reason. It seems odd to me that people don’t mind re-planing stock or sanding it, after their high-end, expensive plane has made marks all over it. However, I would say, in it’s defence you can still add a wooden base to the router with built-in screw holes and this was also a common thing to do with the earlier planes.
I’ll stick with my Preston for now, but good to see new makers on the scene. Here are some more pics, courtesy of Walke Moore. Walker Moore also have an Instagram feed, showing more pics and video.
Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane_3
Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane_4
Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane_1
Walke Moore 2500 Router Plane_2

PS. I did once find a nice page showing a chap making his own wooden plane that did the same job. Damned if I can find it now, of course, such is the confusing morass we have built and called the internet. If anyone recalls this, please do comment.

7 comments

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  1. Anonymous

    Thanx for the link. I’ve given up on getting a Preston P2500 (it’s even harder on this side of the pond) and I’ll be ordering one of these.

  2. Sylvain

    Do you refer to Paul Sellers “poor man’s router”?
    https://paulsellers.com/2012/12/paul-sellers-poor-mans-router-gets-great-results/
    He has also more refined versions of DIY routers( use the search function on his blog)

    Paul Sellers has otherwise a collection of router
    https://paulsellers.com/2014/10/routing-the-past-developments/
    Sylvain

  3. Gary

    Hi Sylvain, No, not Paul Sellers, but thanks for reminding me. No, it was a lesser-known chap, who made the tool specifically for slimming down large tenon cheeks. The iron hung from the end of a longer, flat plane, which had the same dimensions as the Preston tool. He could then set his depth and ‘pull’ the cutter across the tenon face, with the majority of the plane sliding along the work face. Will have to have another look for it tonight. Thanks for getting in touch, good links.

  4. Sylvain

    Ralph (Accidental woodworker) has made a “tenon plane” end of March 2014. The idea came from a guy named Howard but his blog “Hand made in wood” doesn’t exist anymore.
    Sylvain

  5. Gary

    Hi Sylvain, I think ‘Hand Made in Wood’ was the blog. Damn, that was a great blog. Thanks, Gary

  6. Andrey

    Gary,

    Please have a look:
    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/BuildingaWoodenRouterPlane.html

    Is this what you reffered to?

  7. Gary

    Hi Andrey, no, sorry, it was a wooden router with a very long footprint and the blade came in from the end, so you could ‘pull’ it onto the tenon, with the whole router on the work. Very much like a wooden version of the original Preston or this WM version in fact.

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